The other day I noticed that I had a lot more Groundnut (Apios americana) out by the swing set than I had originally thought. I didn’t want to dig up my only patch, but it looked to me like there were three plants out there. I figured that reducing that to two wouldn’t be a tragedy, so today after supper I went out and carefully dug one up.

Groundnut (Apios americana)

Groundnut (Apios americana)


In doing so, I broke into an ant nest. The ants scurried around to move the eggs. I expect they’ll be OK though. By the time I finished my digging, all the eggs had been moved.
The shot above shows some of the leaves, the vine and one tuber. The ant nest is just under the vine on the left, and that’s the tuber at the bottom center.

The tubers are supposed to grow all along a long string of roots, kind of like Christmas lights. I followed the root until it resurfaced a few feet away, and found four tubers. I figured that was enough for a taste, though not a meal, but since I had just had supper, all I really wanted was a taste.

Here is the vine with the four tubers and some leaves laid out on my deck.

Groundnut (Apios americana)

Groundnut (Apios americana)


As you can see, I need to repaint the deck. But let’s not worry about that, OK?

I cut the tubers from the root and brought them in the house.

Four tubers in hand is worth 16 in the bush

Four tubers in hand is worth 16 in the bush

Peterson says they should be washed, peeled, and then boiled for 20 minutes. So I washed them, peeled them, and boiled them for 20 minutes. Here is the finished product:

One mouthful

One mouthful


I ate them slowly from smallest to largest. I thought they were pretty decent! The were very potato-like with just a hint of turnip. I think I could eat a pile of them with no problem if only I could find enough to make a pile.

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