Yesterday I took this shot of Penny before I left for work:

Penny

Penny


She was waiting for me to kick a ball that didn’t make it into the photo. I did kick it for her, as I do nearly every morning before I go to work. The last kick comes just as Jonathan is pulling into the turn-around spot so I can jump in and make my escape while she chases the ball.

Then at lunch time I took a stroll around my usual route in Concord, camera in hand. I wanted to see what was still in bloom. Here’s what I found:

Oenothera biennis (Evening Primrose)

Oenothera biennis (Evening Primrose)


Linarea vulgaris (Butter-and-eggs)

Linarea vulgaris (Butter-and-eggs)


Hieracium pratense (Yellow Hawkweed, King Devil)

Hieracium pratense (Yellow Hawkweed, King Devil)


Trifolium pratense (Red Clover)

Trifolium pratense (Red Clover)


Erigeron annuus (Daisy Fleabane)

Erigeron annuus (Daisy Fleabane)


Lepidium virginicum (Virginia Pepperweed)

Lepidium virginicum (Virginia Pepperweed)


The pepperweed is one of my favorite wild edibles. It has plenty of flavor. I ate this clump right after taking the photo. The flowers are inconspicuous and can barely be seen up there at the top of the stem. The flowers turn to seed and the stem grows higher with flowers ever-blooming at the top.
Solanum dulcamara (Bittersweet)

Solanum dulcamara (Bittersweet)


I wasn’t expecting to see any bittersweet. I found none the last time I looked here, but I guess I wasn’t looking hard enough. There weren’t many blossoms, but there were a lot of berries (which are poisonous).
Solanum dulcamara (Bittersweet) berries

Solanum dulcamara (Bittersweet) berries


These are closely related to tomatoes, as both are in the nightshade family. People used to believe tomatoes were poisonous because so many nightshades are. Nobody has qualms about eating tomatoes these days though.
Solidago spp. (Goldenrod)

Solidago spp. (Goldenrod)


I don’t know which species of goldenrod this is – there are probably a hundred that grow around here, and they are difficult to distinguish. Almost as difficult as the asters. Most of the goldenrod has gone to seed, but there are still a few of them in bloom.
Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem Artichoke)

Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem Artichoke)


This Jerusalem Artichoke is from the same stand I blogged about a little while ago. I didn’t dig any more of them up, but I am going to keep an eye on them so I can maybe score some JA seeds for my place. I think I’ve found a place where I can grow them in the front of the house. There might be enough sun there.

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