The forecast for today was rain, and it was spot on. But that didn’t keep me in the house. Beth and I went out looking for geocaches in Tilton. We had three on our list. The first was on Tilton Island, which we have driven past thousands of times. I have meant to stop there ever since I first saw it, but today was the first time I ever did. It’s a small island in the middle of the Winnipesaukee River, and it’s probably a little more than an acre in size.

The Bandstand on Tilton Island

The Bandstand on Tilton Island


This one was a virtual cache, meaning there is nothing hidden there. You just have to go there, take a few pictures, find the answers a few questions, and email them to the cache owner as proof you’ve been there.

We weren’t just out to geocache though. Beth has a school project tomorrow where she has to bring in five foods that are popular (or produced) in the Northeastern US. She will bring blueberries (New England), Cranberry juice (Maine), Chocloate (Hershey, PA anyone?), Cabot cheese (Vermont), and a half pint of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream (also Vermont). We were also thinking maple syrup would be a good idea, but the kids are supposed to be able to sample the foods. I guess they could have poured it on the ice cream, but… nah. We got cheese instead.

So after Tilton Island, we went to the grocery store and bought the above list of Northeastern US foods. Then we hit a second geocache. This one was hidden in a large Hemlock tree. We went under the branches to find it (and the branches swoop down to ground level, so it’s somewhat sheltered underneath). The cache had fallen from its nest – it was supposed to be found at eye-level, but Beth found it on the ground instead. I put it back to eye-level before we left. When she snagged the cache, the hemlock snagged her hair. I had to break off a twig to free her, and she was none too happy about that!

Then we headed down the road a bit further and revisited a cache that had defeated us twice before. This time we found it. The difference was that before I hadn’t seen very many caches. But now I’ve seen a few more, and we were able to find it. Of course the sky unleashed some rain while we were out there looking for it. We took the cache to a nearby gazebo so we could sign it in a dry place. This is beyond a doubt the tiniest cache I have ever seen:

The Tiniest Cache

The Tiniest Cache


The piece to the right has the log in it. It was a strip of paper rolled up into a tiny scroll. I had Beth put her finger in the lid for scale. We unrolled it, signed it, rolled it back up again, stuffed it in its canister, and then I dashed back out in the downpour and reattached it to the bench we had found it on (it was magnetic).

Then we came home and put the ice cream in the freezer.