I went down to Sandogardy with Beth and David today as planned. We all brought swimsuits. I brought mine because I wanted to wade out into the water to get a picture of a Bullhead Lily (Nuphar lutea). I lugged my tripod out there too and set it up in the water so I could get a decent shot. I took about a dozen pictures, but I like this one best:

Bullhead Lily (Nuphar lutea)

Bullhead Lily (Nuphar lutea)


But I’m getting ahead of myself. Before we even got to the pond I was surprised to see a Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris).
Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris)

Heal-all (Prunella vulgaris)


I really need to check the logs to see what should be in bloom right now so I’m not surprised like that. This one was in the neighbor’s yard.

When we got to the pond I found some sort of St. Johnswort (Hypericum) with which I am unfamiliar. It’s not Common St. Johnswort for sure, but I haven’t been able to determine the species yet. It was very small which makes me think that this bloom hadn’t been open for very long. Here it is:

Some sort of St. Johnswort

Some sort of St. Johnswort

Finally I made my way to the southeast corner of the pond where the Bullhead Lilies grow. I was looking for Lobelia and Pipewort along the way, but I didn’t see either of those. What I did see though were thousands of tiny frogs. Last time we were there I saw thousands of tadpoles, so I’m guessing these are one and the same. Or one million and the same. They were pretty skittish too which made it pretty hard to photograph one. But I did manage to chase one down and wear it out enough to make it sit still for a few seconds. Long enough to take this:

Baby Frog, unknown species

Baby Frog, unknown species


I have no idea of the species. It looks kinda like an American Toad (Bufo americanus), but I won’t make the call just yet. It was only about a quarter inch long. That’s tiny!

I headed toward the Bullhead Lilies again. I waded in, and that’s when I saw the Floating Heart (Nymphoides cordata). I setup the tripod and took several shots. That was harder to do than it might sound, because the tripod has the tendency to snag the stems of this plant, and that would pull the surface parts under water. Oops! Luckily, there were lots of specimens to choose from, and I was able to get set up pretty close to a couple and get off some good shots. Here’s the best one:

Floating Heart (Nymphoides cordata)

Floating Heart (Nymphoides cordata)

Once I thought I had enough photos of that, I waded out some more, still making my way to the Bullheads. I waded through some Bryozoa, but didn’t take any photos. As I already wrote, I took several shots of the Bullheads, and then I noticed some White Fragrant Lilies (Nymphaea odorata) farther out. These flowers close up in the afternoon, and they were closed when I found them. I still took several pictures, but since they don’t do the flower justice, I won’t bother uploading any.

Having exhausted all the aquatics, I went ashore and checked on the Sheep Laurel (Kalmia angustifolia). I have a little of this on my place, but my plants are puny. There’s a plant that grows at Sandogardy, and in fact, that was the first one I had ever identified. It was in full bloom with lots and lots of pink flowers. I took half a dozen shots including this one:

Sheep Laurel (Kalmia angustifolia)

Sheep Laurel (Kalmia angustifolia)


What a gorgeous plant. Poisonous, yes, but still gorgeous.

All the while I was taking pictures, Beth and David were swimming in the pond. I took a few shots of them too:

Penny, trying to get Beth to throw a stick for her

Penny, trying to get Beth to throw a stick for her


Yes, Penny was trying to get Beth to throw her a stick. If you look closely, you can see the stick bobbing in the water off Beth’s right shoulder (left side of the picture). Talk about a dog with a one-track mind.
And here’s David.
David, showing off his mussels

David, showing off his mussels

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