Tonight as I was putzing around the yard looking for blooms, Beth asked if we could go meet our neighbors across the road. They’ve lived there for almost two years now, and we’ve never said “boo” to them. So it was about time.

Beth’s impetus was their horses.

We headed over and when we got there, they met us in the yard and invited us in. We also traded apologies for not introducing ourselves sooner. After a few minutes of talking, Beth thought she was going to explode and whispered to me “Can I say anything yet?” I told her “Sure!” and she asked if she could go meet their horse.

So they took us outside and introduced her to Splash.

Beth with Splash

Beth with Splash

They have a second horse, but it is off working a summer camp right now.
Splash is a very nice and gentle horse, and the neighbors were also very nice people. I wish we had introduced ourselves sooner.

But back to blooms! There were two nice developments today. First, the Blue-eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium montanum) opened today. If you don’t recognize it by the name, I can tell you that it’s the species featured in this blog’s banner photo. Here’s the picture I took today though:

Sisyrinchium montanum

Sisyrinchium montanum


This was growing at the end of my turn-around spot in the driveway. I noticed it yesterday, but it had not yet opened then. I also took a walk along the woods trail and was surprised to see this:
Pink Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium acaule)

Pink Lady's Slipper (Cypripedium acaule)


It’s a Pink Lady’s Slipper (Cypripedium acaule). This is a pretty crappy photo too, but even though I was covered head-to-foot with deet, I thought the mosquitoes were going to carry me off. So I didn’t take the time necessary to get a good shot.

I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised at seeing it, but I was. I found two of these along the trail. I expect there are more out there in my woods, and I expect I will find them over the next couple of weeks. These plants are endangered in several states (though they are listed as secure, I guess they face extirpation in some locales – and NH is not one of those locales). So even if they are not endangered, people should still leave them alone in the wild, because they hardly ever survive transplantation attempts.

But I don’t need to transplant them. I’ve got them blooming in my woods.

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